LIFE IS SYNCHRONOUS

Source:Storytelling

“Mind meld” is a term used to describe synchronizing our mind with that of someone else,providing access to that individual’sthoughts, memories and emotional state. Well, neuroscience now reports that, in a fashion, we mere humans can achieve a kind of mind melding.

Most of us have experienced what it feels like to “get” another person in an intuitive way, what we refer to as “instant rapport” or “clicking” or “being in sync.” It can forge a powerful and sustained interpersonal bond.

Well, using neuroimaging, researchers from Princeton University were able to actually see this “clicking” as it occurred in people’s brains. They went so far as to assert that two brains can be “coupled” in a way that generates nearly identical neurological signatures, so to speak.

In other words, during a conversation in which both parties experience mutual rapport, their respective brain activity is closely aligned. So when it feels like you and another person are on the same wavelength, you probably are – not just mentally and emotionally, but also neurologically. And while you can’t read that person’s mind, you may be able to intimately sense feelings, view of the world, way of thinking, etc.

So how do we create the equivalent of a mind meld?

In the study, storytelling played a major role, which is no surprise. Since the emergence of human culture long ago, sharing our stories, both real and fictional, has been the primary means for imparting historical events, values, life lessons, spiritual beliefs and the like.

So, if you really want to connect with someone at a deep level, exchange stories that evoke emotions, catalyze thinking, generate mental images and communicate meaning. For example, if you want to create a mind meld with your child in order to impart a message or value, then use storytelling.

Even today in our technology-saturated culture, stories make up much of the content of such diverse media as movies, Facebook, video games and even Twitter (very short stories). However, without a face-to-face or at least voice-to-ear interaction, human mind melding is tough to achieve.

The missing component, and one the cyber world can’t yet provide, is an interactive process called “pacing.” This involves approximating (not mimicking) and harmonizing with the other person’s nonverbal behaviors – posture, gestures, facial expressions, even the sound of her or his voice.

When we get in sync with someone both verbally (through shared stories) and nonverbally (through pacing), this mix appears to activate “mirror neurons” in the brain, which are involved in generating empathy, a core ingredient in a human mind meld.

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